Record Lamb, Wood Prices Peak Interest In Sheep

Record Lamb, Wood Prices Peak Interest In Sheep

NDSU Extension is holding tour Oct. 25-27 for new and expanding producers. Tour will take in custom lamb feed yard in Hurley, S.D.; total confinement operation in Harlan, Iowa, and research stations in Brookings, S.D., and Clay Center, Neb.

The North Dakota State University Extension Service is holding a tour of research and private sheep operations in South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa on Oct. 25 -26.

"The American sheep industry is experiencing record-breaking high lamb and wool prices, and that's inspiring many sheep producers to expand their operation," says Reid Redden, NDSU Extension sheep specialist. "It also is encouraging new producers to enter the business. As a result, North Dakota likely will see many new sheep flocks started by less-experienced producers with lots of questions."

The tour will provide more experience in the commercial sheep industry for producers and the Extension agents assisting them. Participants will visit state-of-the-art sheep facilities and meet sheep industry leaders in the north-central region of the U.S.

Tentative stops for the tour are:

  • South Dakota State University Sheep Unit, Brookings - Jeff Held will provide a tour of the sheep barn and discuss research topics at SDSU.
  • Dakota Lamb, Hurley, S.D. - Bill Aeschilmann will provide a tour of his custom lamb feed yard and discuss his lamb marketing business.
  • U.S. Meat Animal Research Center, Clay Center, Neb. - Kreg Leymaster will provide an educational seminar on commercial sheep breeding systems and lead a tour of the research center.
  • Iron Horse Farms, Harlan, Iowa - Tom Schechinger will provide a tour of his 100 percent confinement sheep operation.
The registration fee is $50 to cover the transportation costs. The registration deadline is Oct. 14. For more information or to register, contact Redden at (701) 231-5597 or [email protected].
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