Planting Lags 15-18 Days In North Dakota

Planting Lags 15-18 Days In North Dakota

Wheels are turning in South Dakota, but pace is behind last year.

Small grains planting is getting underway in South Dakota, but wheels aren't turning in North Dakota. The average starting date for fieldwork in North Dakota is expected to be May 6 — 18 days later than last year and 15 days behind the five year average, to the North Dakota National Agricultural Statistics Service.

North Dakota NASS expects starting dates across North Dakota ranged from May 2 in the south central district to May 9 in the north central district.

Improved weather conditions over the weekend gave cattle producers welcome relief, though some calves were showing signs of stress and sickness. Calving was 76% complete, while lambing was 87% complete. Cow conditions were rated 2% poor, 21 fair, 68 good and 9 excellent. Calf conditions were rated 3% poor, 22% fair, 66% good and 9% excellent. Sheep conditions were rated 2% poor, 20% fair, 70% good and 8% excellent. Lamb conditions were rated 4% poor, 20% fair, 70% good and 6 excellent. Shearing was 92% complete.

Hay and forage supplies were rated 1% very short, 11% short, 81% adequate, and 7% surplus. The grain and concentrate supply was rated 1% very short, 7% short, 87% adequate and 5% surplus.

Pastures and ranges were rated 84% still dormant.

South Dakota

Spring  wheat  planting is estimated at 9% complete in South Dakota, compared to 61% last year and 47% for the five-year average, according to the South Dakota NASS. Sixteen percent of the oats has been planted, down from 57%  for last year. Eight percent of the barley has been planted, compared to 40% last year and 26% for the five-year average. The percent of winter wheat breaking dormancy is almost complete with 97% of winter wheat broken dormancy, behind last year's 99%. Winter wheat  condition is 1% very poor, 3% poor, 26% fair, 60% good, and 10% excellent.

TAGS: Wheat
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